In Praise of Peppercorns

After tasting probably the finest pepper in the world, we’ve realized that the generic pepper eaten at home is flavourless and uninspiring. We think we can do better.

PEPPER FACTS

Black pepper is the world’s most traded spice. Today, Americans consume more pepper than all other spices combined and pepper makes up about one-fourth of the world’s trade in spices.

Pepper has been around for ever; the plant is native to India and has been used in cooking since 2000 BCE. In fact, pepper was such a prized trade good that it was referred to as “black gold” and used as a currency.

Peppercorns come from a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae. The vine’s fruit is green when it’s fresh. Once it’s dried, we get black, red or white peppercorns. Pepper has demonstrated significant health benefits and is known to improve digestion.

KAMPOT PEPPER

Luckily for us, we’re in Kampot – practically the land of delicious premium peppercorns. Like champagne, Kampot pepper has a protected geographical indication, which recognizes the uniqueness of its key qualities. There’s a mystique surrounding Kampot pepper. Some people in the industry allude to the high quartz content in the soil as an explanation for its rich flavours. Whatever the reason, we’ve fallen under its spell.

In Kampot, pepper is ubiquitous. We’ve found it in everything ranging from curries and chocolate to  vinaigrette and vanilla ice cream. Battered and fried green peppercorns are also delicious. We’ve heard it’s great with fish and the Brits are bonkers for it on their strawberries.

ONE GRIND AT A TIME

We now have an entirely new appreciation for premium pepper. And, just as in recent years high quality salt has found an important place in the kitchen, we believe that the same is true for pepper. It’s black and white.

One of our next stops is Kerala, India – home of the Tellicherry peppercorns. We’ll be sure to report back on our experience with another of the world’s highest grade peppercorns.

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “In Praise of Peppercorns

  1. Very interesting!! I can’t eat a meal ( except breakfast if it is only yogurt) without pepper from a grinder! I found saffron from Iran( supposedly the best saffron ) at the Spice Bazaar in Istanbul. Other favourite spices of mine are tumeric and cumin. I am making a chicken dish today that has all 3 of those spices in it, and I will be adding lots of freshly ground pepper!😋 Your parents ( and grandparents) are coming and Paynes and Lenczners and we will enjoy dinner after a couple of hours of bridge. A&E&F will be here also. Did you know there is a tadpole in Ali’s tummy?😀 Hugs, Mp ( zero degrees Fahrenheit here this AM!!!)

    Mary Pat Armstrong Sent from my iPhone

    >

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  2. I am convinced!

    Best

    Jens

    ________________________________ Fra: The Biggars: 2015-16 Asia and Southern Africa Sendt: 17. oktober 2015 09:27 Til: jlr@dadlnet.dk Emne: [New post] In Praise of Peppercorns

    nigel biggar posted: “After tasting probably the finest pepper in the world, we’ve realized that the generic pepper eaten at home is flavourless and uninspiring. We think we can do better. PEPPER FACTS Black pepper is the world’s most traded spice. Today, Americans con”

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  3. Hi Biggars,

    I continue to enjoy reading your blogs and through them the joy and unique experiences you are receiving. As to peppercorns, wouldn’t Biggar Peppercorns excite foodies if exported to Canada ?

    Warm regards,

    Bob

    Robert.Armstrong@focusasset.ca 416 815-1800 1.888.525.2111

    416 922-4812. Toronto 905 880-0764 Caledon 772 581-4282 Orchid Island

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